The Maine Trip - August 12 - 18, 2000
Photos taken by Jim Rosso, during a week long trip to Maine.
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Belfast, Bel-Harbor, Acadia National Park, Camden
Mixed Species Flocking
Photography Notes
Black Guillemot - immature plumage
Black Guillemot - diving
Great Black-backed Gull
Great Black-backed Gull - 3rd year plumage
Herring Gull
Herring Gull
Bl. Backed Gull and Herring Gulls
Herring Gull
Common Eider - all female/immature plumage
Great bl. Backed Gull - compare to underwing of Herring Gull above.
Very Old Osprey Nest
Common Tern
Common Tern
Common Tern
Black Duck - female
Black Duck - male
Black Duck - male
Black Duck
Hairy Woodpecker
Downy Woodpecker
Three Golden-crowned Kinglet fledglings
Black and White Warbler
Black-throated Green Warbler
Black-throated Green Warbler
Black-throated Green Warbler
Black-throated Green Warbler
Black-throated Green Warbler
Black-throated Green Warbler
Parula Warbler - taking food to a fledged bird.
Parula Warbler - immature waiting for food from adult.

Mixed Species Flocking

I was in Maine before the majority of migration was to have started. But our observations of the birds led me to anticipate that migration was occurring. Periods of quiet were interrupted with large numbers of birds in mixed flocks. This was the first time however that I saw warblers feeding young. I watched Parula Warblers, and Yellow-rumped Warblers feeding their young during this time. In addition, a family of Hairy Woodpeckers sometimes fed with the Bl. throated Green Warblers. This always occurred when other species were present. A typical feeding group included Bl. Throated Green Warblers, Downy Woodpeckers, Hairy Woodpeckers, Black capped Chickadees, and Robins. In addition Golden crowned Kinglets, Yellow-rumped Warblers, Brown Creepers, White-breasted Nuthatches, sometimes joined the group.

It is possible that there was one mixed species feeding group that rotated through the area feeding together. This could have been a pre-migration activity. I base this on the observation that for two mornings in a row at Jordan Pond in Acadia National Monument, the same species of birds were observed feeding togeather. The family of Hairy Woodpeckers were never seen except in the company of Bl. throated Green Warblers. My anticipation of migration is that different species would be seen flying through the area instead of the same participants. I have seen articles on mixed species flocking in breeding territories in the tropics but not in temperate zones.

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Photography Notes

Two lenses were used during this week. The majority of bird shots were done with a 180ED lens. This was used for its quickness and manueverability. The warblers were feeding off low bushes and moving quickly. When I used the 300 mm lens I was missing most of the shots. With the 180 I could respond quicker to the birds. All the shots were done with flash and I was using a #1 extension ring on the 180 lens so I could focus closer. The Black and White Warbler was shot with the 300 mm lens without flash. I used Kodak Extachrome 100 ASA film.

I was only able to shoot three rolls of film during the week.

 

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